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No breed feature this weekend

12 Apr

Hi everyone,

 

Just in case any of you are actually interested in and follow the breed profiles that i have been doing each weekend, i wanted to let you know that i wont be doing one this weekend as i am feeling poorly and tired. Because i was silly and left it until now to consider doing (i usually prepare them during the week) i decided i would give it a miss.

 

Sorry for any disappointment, but here is a cute picture to make you smile…

 

dog cuddle

Cairn Terrier

6 Apr

cairn t

 

Description:

Like most terrier types, this dog may be little, but it is also very sturdy. It has a fairly broad head, with a strong muzzle. The teeth should meet in a scissors or level bite. Their eyes are hazel in colour, deep and wide set. Their nose is black. They have small ears that are wide set and stand up straight. The shaggy, double, weather-resistant coat has a harsh outer coat with a soft undercoat. You can find this breed in almost any colour except for white. If you buy the dog from a puppy, it is not always easy to tell what colour he will be as an adult as their colouration changes as they grow older.

 

cairn

 

Health problems:

This hardy little dog is also very healthy. They do gain weight easily and are also allergic to fleas. As with many terrier breeds, these dogs can develop problems with their legs.

 

Grooming:

Despite its scruffy appearance, this little dog does need a fair amount of maintenance. They need to be brushed several times a week and bathed on a monthly basis. The fur around the ears and eyes should be trimmed.

 

Origin:

This is one of Scotlands original terriers, originating in the 1500’s. The Cairn was named for the way it would squeeze down into “cairns” and bark at fox and badgers until the farmer could arrive to kill them. It was not considered a different breed from the West Highland Terrier and the Scottish Terrier until the 1900’s. The most famous Cairn Terrier was probably the dog who played Toto in the Wizard of Oz.

 

cairn toto

 

Temperament:

Like most terrier breeds, this is an alert little dog who is always curious and up for mischief. They are lovable and loyal and enjoy spending time with children and generally get on well with other dogs. Of course socialization is important. They can be found to be quite willful and so need a firm owner who will be consistent with rules and boundaries. They can be taught to do tricks, but without proper stimulation they can become destructive due to their inquisitive nature.  As a terrier, they do have strong instincts to chase and so you must be careful when your dog is let off leash, it could end up chasing a rabbit down a hole. As with all small dogs, you must be careful not to allow it to develop small dog syndrome. Remember that is it not a baby, but a dog, provide clear leadership, plenty of exercise and stimulation, and you will have a calm and loving companion.

 

cairns

 

Living conditions:

These little dogs are very active indoors, but will do ok without a yard. Providing they receive enough exercise, they should be happy to live in an apartment. Play will take care of much of their exercise needs. However these active little dogs still need a daily walk (or two) in order to take care of their instincts to walk, allowing them to pick up their “pee mail”.

 

Life expectancy:

12-15 years

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cwj72psUiM

 

 

 

 

http://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pets4homes/home.nsf/breedinfo/cairnterrier

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/cairnterrier.htm

http://animal.discovery.com/breed-selector/dog-breeds/terrier/cairn-terrier.html

Irish Wolfhound

31 Mar

 

irish 2

 

Description:

This dog truly is the giant of the dog world, being one of the tallest breeds, even reaching the size of a small pony. The reach 28-35 inches in height and weigh 40-69kg (90-150 pounds). When standing on its hind legs. this is a dog that can be taller than a man, reaching up to 7 feet tall! This dog has a long head with a long and pointed muzzle. When the dog is relaxed, it holds its ears back against the head, and you will see them partway pricked when it is excited. They have a long tail which hangs down and is slightly curved. They have a shaggy, wiry coat that is rough to the tough. It is longer over the eyes and under the jaw. The colours include grey, brindle, red, black, pure white or fawn. Although the most commonly seen is grey.

 

irish descr        irish

 

 

Health problems:

Prone to cardiomyopathy, bone cancer, bloat, PRA, Von Willebrands, and hip dysplasia.

 

Origin:

This is a very old breed of dog, even appearing in Roman records. The dog was used in wars, for guarding and also for hunting with their name coming from their use of hunting wolves. This is a dog that was highly treasured with battles being fought over them and often being given as royal presents. When the boar and wolf became extinct in Ireland, the Irish Wolfhound declined, but the breed was restored using the introduction of great dane and deerhound blood. The breed was recognized by the american kennle clb in 1897 shortly after the Irish Wolfhound Club was founded. In 1935 they were recognized as a sporting breed by the kennel  club.

 

Temperament:

Although you might feel intimidated by their size, these tend to be very gentle, good natured and patient animals. They are very intelligent and always eager to please their humans. They respond very well to firm, but gentle leadership and like all dogs they need consistency when it comes to following rules and boundires. They tend to get on well with children and can generally get on with anybody they meet. As a giant breed, they are often very clumsy and also take about two years before they are fully grown. This also means that they take longer to mature regarding their mind (they stay young for a long time). Whilst it is still young, walks must be kept short so to allow its developing legs to stay strong without putting too much pressure on it. It is important that they are trained to heel before they get too large.

irish child         irish-wolfhound-0001

 

Grooming:

Despite its scruffy appearance, this dog does need regular and thorough grooming with a bursh and groom. The coat should be plucked once or twice a year to remove excess dead hair.

 

Living conditions:

Although it is relatively inactive indoors, this dog is not suited for apartment life and does best with a large yard. As a giant breed, it needs some space. This also might mean that you need to invest in a larger car in order to take it for trips out or to visit the vet. Although large in size, they would be unhappy living in a kennel as they love to be a part of the family. These dogs need lots of space to run, but in reality do not need any more exercise than smaller breeds. As always they need a minimum of a one walk a day in order to fulfill their instincts to walk. Make sure they they are made to heel as not only do they need to see you as their leader but they are also easily big enough to pull you over.

 

Life expectancy:

6-8 years

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0C3ISiZ4W04

 

 

 

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/irishwolfhound.htm

http://www.europuppy.com/dog_breed_choosing/irish_wolfhound_puppies.html

http://www.irishwolfhounds.org/

http://www.akc.org/breeds/irish_wolfhound/index.cfm

 

 

 

Bernese Mountain Dog

30 Mar

 

bern

 

 

Description:

The Bernese Mountain dog is a pretty large, dog weighing in at between 36 and 50 kg (80-110 pounds) and reaching 23-28 inches in height with males being slightly larger. Although they are strong and sturdy in build, they are also agile. They have a broad head with a strong and straight muzzle, the teeth meeting in a scissor bite. They have triangular ears which are medium in size and set high on the head. Their tail is long and bushy, carried low. They have a fairly long coat which is thick and slightly wavy or straight and is weather resistant. The dog is tricoloured and has symmetrical markings of black, white and rust. The dog will have a white blaze on the chest and also on the head, toes and top of the tail. The rust colour is seen on the cheeks, over each eye, on each side of the chest, on all four legs and underneath the tail.

 

bernese

 

Health problems:

This is another breed that generally do not have too many health issues to contend with. However they are prone to bloat and so feeding needs to be careful managed so that it is suitable i.e more small meals rather than large meals.  They are also prone to some cancers, problems with their eyelids and hip and elbow dysplasia. This is another breed that will gain wait easily and so feeding and exercise must be appropriate.

 

Origin:

This breed originated in the Swiss mountains. They are working dogs often used at pulling carts to market and also used to drive cattle and to watch over the farm. The numbers decreased in the 19th century as other working breeds were being introduced to Switzerland.

 

bern cart

 

Grooming:

Due to their long, thick coat, weekly brushing is needed and is particularly important when they are shedding.  The breed is a seasonal, heavy shedder. Baths are only required when necessary.

 

Temperament:

These dogs make great companions and members of the family as they get on great with children. They also tend to get on well with other pets and also often are friendly with strangers.  With any dog it is important to socialize well. These dogs are very intelligent and easy to train and although they are very confident, they are not often overly dominant.  As will all breeds of dog it is important for an owner of a Bernese mountain dog to show strong leadership. If you are calm and assertive, setting out clear rules and boundaries for your dog to follow, a Bernese mountain dog owner should encounter very few problems.

 

bernese child

 

Living conditions:

These large, active dogs are not generally recommended for life as an apartment dog. They are relatively active indoors but would be happiest with a large, fenced in yard to play in. It is important that they get regular exercise which may even include being trained to pull a cart or wagon for periods of time. A long daily walk is a must in order to fulfill both their exercise needs and their instincts to walk. Due to their thick coats they can be sensitive to heat and tend to do best in colder temperatures.

 

bern cold

 

Life expectancy:

6-8 years

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gqGZFrSeyI

 

 

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/bernesemountain.htm

http://www.bmdinfo.org/

http://www.justdogbreeds.com/bernese-mountain-dog.html

Pug

23 Mar

pug

 

Description:

Everyone recognizes this funny little character. This is a small yet stock dog which is fairly square in shape.  They tend to reach between 10 and 14 inches in height and 6-9 kg (13-20 pounds) in weight, with females being slightly smaller than males, though not by much. They have a big round house with a short, blunt muzzle. The teeth should meet in a slightly undershot bite. One of their most noticeable features are their very large, dark prominent eyes. They have small ears which are either rose or button shaped and thin. On the face you will notice that they have deep wrinkles, some more than others. They have a high set tail which is curled over the back. Some are seen with a double curl, something that is often preferred in the competitive world. This breed has a short, soft coat which is very fine. The colouring is apricot, fawn, black and silver.

 

download

 

 

Health problems:

Unfortunately this is a breed that is fairly prone to numerous health problems. They are very sensitive to the weather and catch colds easily. They commonly suffer from various allergies and due to their short muzzle they are brachycephalic and often struggle with breathing, tending to wheeze and snore.  Their eyes are prone to weeping and they may also suffer from ulcers on the cornea. They are also prone to skin problems, particularly regarding their wrinkles which need to be kept clean. Mast cell tumours is another issue that they are prone to. Prone to Pug Dog Encephalitis (PDE), an inflammation of the brain that strikes adolescent Pugs usually between the ages of 2 and 3. Due to the size of their head, if you are breeding your pug you will want to factor in the possibility of needing a cesarean section. This is a dog that will eat as much as it can and so you need to be careful with their diet and exercise so not to become obese.

 

Grooming:

This is a dog that is fairly easy to groom, with its short coat a simple brush with a firm bristle brush will do fine. Shampooing is only needed when necessary, and it is important that the dog is dried thoroughly afterwards due to their sensitivity to the cold. It is important that the creases on their face are kept clean to avoid any skin problems. This breed does shed heavily, but only seasonally.

 

Origin:

This is one of the oldest breeds of dog known today. Most researchers believe that it originated from Asia, descended from a short-haired Pekingese. However another theory is that is is the result of crossing a small bulldog. These dogs have been owned by a number of people from Tibetan monasteries to royals from varying countries. The breed became pipular in the 19th century and was recognized by the american kennel club in 1885.

 

Temperament:

This is very much a happy go lucky dog, which is loyal and affectionate but also very rambunctious. Despite their comic appearance, this is a very intelligent breed which needs to be kept occupied and have variability with its training. Be careful that your dog knows that you are in charge and does not come to believe that it is more strong minded than its humans. They are sensitive to the tone of your voice and you need to be careful that you are calm, firm and confident when giving commands and it is vital that you and any family (pack) members are consistent with the rules. This is a breed that tends to do well with other pets and will behave well with visitors and children. Like all dogs, they need to know that their human is a string pack leader. If not they may have issues with guarding behaviors and become jealous.

 

puggy

 

Living conditions:

This dog is fairly inactive indoors and can do fine without a yard, making them suitable for apartment life. They should in fact be kept indoors at a comfortable temperature to avoid any temperature related stress. Like all dogs, it is important to fulfill their instincts to walk and should be taken on daily walks. Make sure that they are made to heel so that they respect that you are their leader and not the other way around. Although they enjoy regular exercise and lots of play activity, you must be careful not to overdo it because of their breathing difficulties.

 

Life expectancy:

12-15 years

 

 

head tilt

Did i mention that they are famous for their head tilt?

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/pug.htm

http://www.pugvillage.com/pug-faqs/pug-faqs

http://www.companionpups.com/Pages/PugBreedInfo.aspx

Greyhound

23 Mar

 

grey

 

Description:

The greyhound is a tall and slender dog, built for speed. They reach 27 to 30 inches in height and weigh between 27 and 36 kg (60-80 pounds) with females being slightly smaller than males. They have a long and narrow head which is wide between the ears and a long muzzle. The ears are held back high on the head and folded. They have dark eyes. Their legs are long and straight and they have a tail that is long with a slight upward curve. The anatomy makes them perfect for sprinting, light yet muscular with the biggest heart in the dog world. The coat is short and comes in a range of colours.

 

Health problems:

This is a very healthy breed with few hereditary conditions. The most common problem seen in these dogs is bloat and it therefore is more beneficial to feed in several small meals in a day rather that one large one. This is a breed that may also be sensitive to some drugs including some flea treatments.

 

Origin:

This is an ancient breed with paintings found in ancient Egyptian tombs showing a dog similar in structure. As a sighthound, they have extremely good vision and have been used for centuries in helping humans to catch their quarry, as well for its sporting abilities. Interestingly the greyhound is only second to the cheetah and one species of antelope as the worlds fastest land animals. Today there are two types of Greyhounds being bred: Show lines, which conform to the written standard and racing lines, bred for speed. The Greyhound was recognized by the AKC in 1885.

race

 

 

Grooming:

This is a very low maintenance dog which requires little grooming although the breed is an average shedder.

 

Temperament:

This is a very devoted breed which is intelligent, loving and laid back however it can be reserved when meeting new people and sometimes even around its owner. This is another breed where natural authority is a must as these dogs are very sensitive to the tone of voice and look to someone with calm authority who is willing to be consistent with clear rules and boundaries. As these dogs may sometimes have a timid nature, socialisation is important. Although they have a high prey drive, these dogs are usually very even tempered and gentle. Their prey drive is very strong and so they instinctively chase anything that moves fast. That being said some with a low prey drive may automatically get along fine with small animals such as cats, and others may be trained. It is important however to bear in mind their drive and speed and therefore their ability to kill. Usually they get on fine with other dogs and will do well with children providing the child is aware that the dog does not like to play rough. In the home they are generally very calm and laid back, often to the point of being considered lazy. To someone who has the right calm authority, these make a wonderful companion.

 

cat grey

 

Living conditions:

Although fairly big in size, these dogs can do well in an apartment providing they get the exercise they need. They are fairly inactive inside and will do well with a small yard.  A common misconception is that due to their speed they need huge amounts of exercise. Whilst it is important to fulfill their instincts to walk, they are happy to sit around and relax all day and then have short bursts of speed when outside and let off the leash. Bear in mind that you must be sure that it is safe to let them off the leash due to their instinct to chase. They need to be made to heel and no that their human is their leader. They are sensitive to the cold but providing they wear a coat outside they should do fine in colder climates. Due to its slim body and thin skin, it is important that these dogs have a soft bed to sleep on as hard surfaces may result in sores.

 

coat

 

 

Life expectancy:

10-12 years

 

Where to get one:

If you want to bring a puppy into your life, as always it is important to do your research and find a reputable breeder, ask lots of questions and to see the parents (or at least mother). Avoid puppy mills. If you are considering an older dog, it may be worth finding a rescue dog or a retired race dog. Retried race dogs used to be put down but now there are many rescue groups out there dedicated to finding these dogs loving homes to spend the rest of their lives.

 

 

 

 

http://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pets4homes/home.nsf/breedinfo/greyhound

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/greyhound.htm

http://greyhoundgap.org.uk/homing-a-adoption/homeless-hounds?gclid=CKOhn7nYjrYCFabLtAod90AAJw

 

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

17 Mar

cavi

 

Description:

This is a small dog and the smallest of the Spaniels. Both males and females reach 12 to 13 inches in height and weight 5 to 8 kgs (10 to 18 pounds).  The head is slightly rounded and the teeth meet in a scissor bite. They have expressive eyes, usually dark in colour and round in shape. They are set well apart and quite large, though not prominent. The nose is black with wide nostrils. Like other spaniel breeds, they have long ears which are covered in hair and feathering. Occasionally the tail can be docked but is more commonly left natural. It has a silky, medium length coat with lots of feathering and come in a variety of colours.

 

cav

 

Health problems:

Can be prone to syringomyelia, hereditary eye disease, dislocating kneecaps (patella), back troubles, ear infections, early onset of deafness or hearing trouble. Sometime’s hip dysplasia. Don’t over feed. This breed tends to gain weight easily. When selecting one of these dogs, it is extremely important to check the medical history of several previous generations.

 

Origin:

In the late 1600s the King Charles Spaniels were interbred with pugs, which resulted in a smaller dog with flatter noses, upturned faces, rounded heads and protruding eyes. This breed was once  known as a ‘comforte dog’ and doctors even wrote prescriptions with this little dog as the remedy for various sicknesses. The royal name, ‘King Charles Spaniel’ was bestowed during the reign of King Charles II, who was so fond of his spaniels he could not be parted from them. He made a decree that King Charles Spaniels must be allowed in any public place, including the House of Parliament. This decree is still in the law books today.

 

Temperament:

Like the other spaniel breeds, this little dog seems to always have a wagging tail, he is affectionate and eager to please. Despite their small size, these dogs are very outgoing and fearless in most situations. They are fairly intelligent and so are relatively easy to train, often doing well at obedience. This is a dog that will usually get on with other animals, whether it be another dog or other family pets. They also do well with children, but must be socialized young like any other breed. They do have strong instincts to chase due to their hunting background and so it is important that they are trained well for recall if they are going to be let off leash. Like many small dog breeds (and all dogs in general) these dogs need to know who is boss. They need consistency and rules to follow.

 

lkjkj77

 

Living conditions:

As a small dog, they do well in apartment life, but are fairly active indoors and do well with a small yard. You should note that they do not do well in very warm conditions. All dogs need a daily walk to fulfil their walking instincts, and this small dog is no exception. Play will take care of most of their exercise needs and they love nothing more than a good play off leash in a big yard or park.

 

Life expectancy:

9 to 15 years.

 

 

 

http://www.baywood-pets.co.uk/cavalier-info.html

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/cavalierkingcharlesspaniel.htm